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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions:

  1. What is good "netiquette" for visitors who are new to the Greedy Associate clubs?
  2. Who is Bob Gunderson?
  3. What are Greedy Associates?
  4. What is lurking?
  5. What is a "SKEK"?
  6. What is a "Flounder"?
  7. What is the RealGAs club about?
  8. How did the RealGAs club end up being hosted by Findlaw's infirmation.com?
  9. What is the "IB" aka "Idiot Board" aka "Icky Board"?
  10. Who or What is "Transition Defense"?
  11. What is a "Timmy"?
  12. What is "YSB"?
  13. Why do some people insist on using the incorrect spelling "rEdiculous"?
  14. What is the Revised Model Salary Code (RMSC)?
  15. What is the Revised Model Bonus Code (RMBC)?
  16. Who was Sheila E?
  17. What is "Spree disclosure"?
  18. Where can I find the Greedy Associates in the news?
  19. What is an "SP" aka "sock puppet"?
  20. Who is Plated?
  21. What is a Radio Shack firm?
  22. What are "cookies," and why does FindLaw's infirmation.com use them?
  23. Who is the Fat Guy at Willkie?
  24. What is the Patch?
  25. What is "NTTAWWT"?
  26. How do I type my post in html format?
  27. What is an "em"?
  28. What is "we Todd did"?
  29. Why didn't my URL show up as a link?
  30. How do I change my user name and profile?
  31. What is "TMI"?
  32. What is "IMHO"?
  33. Can you translate this British slang?
  34. How do I delete "cookies" from my computer?
  35. When is it appropriate to use the "Post as Anonymous" button?
  36. What is a "K race"?
  37. What is "LOL"?
  38. What is "TCB"?
  39. What is "MOT"?
  40. What is a wingnut?
  41. What happens when I post as anonymous?
  42. Why do people refer to toasters?
  43. Why do people refer to a siren in their posts?
  44. How do I insert a picture into my post?

Questions and Answers:
  1. Q: What is good "netiquette" for visitors who are new to the Greedy Associate clubs?

    A: First off, what is "netiquette"? Netiquette is the set of rules that you should follow when joining a discussion forum on the internet. When first checking out the Greedy Associate message boards, the following are some pointers to make your stay more enjoyable:

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  2. Q: Who is Bob Gunderson?

    A: Bob Gunderson is a lawyer who left Brobeck a few years back, and he started up his own firm, along with others, called Gunderson Dettmer. Around January 2000, Mr. Gunderson decided that he wanted to stem the tide of lawyers from his firm who were leaving to go over to dot-com companies in hopes of striking it rich in stock options. As a result, Mr. Gunderson raised starting salaries from $95,000 to $125,000, with the potential to earn bonuses up to $20,000. Associates, when they heard of this raise at the firm, gave the saintly Mr. Gunderson a standing ovation. This starting salary was unprecedented -- anywhere in the country. Silicon Valley firms refused to sit by idly and let Gunderson Dettmer. become the new standard bearer for law firms across the country. As a result, firms quickly matched Mr. Gunderson's bold move, and raised salaries accordingly, with most setting base salaries for 1999 law school graduates at $125,000, and bonuses of up to $30,000, often based upon billable hours. Once Silicon Valley firms stepped up and matched, other firms around the country fell into line as well. New York, DC, and Chicago offices realized that they would have to pay the same rate to retain and attract associates, leading to a nationwide salary war, and what is truly the golden era for greedy associates.

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  3. Q: What are Greedy Associates?

    A: The answer to this one goes back to the beginning. Around September 1998, someone started up a club called Greedy Associates, and decided that it would be a place for law firm associates to exchange information about their respective firms. Associates at law firms around the country started reading the club and contributing. These associates all became known as "Greedy Associates," or "GAs" for short.

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  4. Q: What is lurking?

    A: When FindLaw's Infirmation.com built the Greedy Associate boards, they incorporated a feature that showed "who is here." That feature simply showed which IDs had visited the particular GA board within the last 15 minutes. Some people said that they liked the "who is here" feature, while other GAs did not like the feature. FindLaw's infirmation.com decided to let the GAs make the call as to whether they wanted to appear or not. Now, if you see your name in the "who is here" area of a particular board, you can click on "lurk," and no one else will see your name.

    If you see the word "Lurk" on your screen, you are not lurking. Rather, you are being offered the opportunity to lurk. You can post while lurking. You can lurk while posting. If you don't want to be conspicuous, just click on lurk, and feel free to skulk around the boards.

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  5. Q: What is a "SKEK"?

    A: Back in the days of the first GA boards, people who logged in were concerned that people would be able to "out" them. That is, they were afraid that someone would be able to look at the list of messages, review all of the messages posted by a certain ID, and then figure out who was the person behind the ID. In an effort to curb that fear, as well as encourage the free flow of information, someone created an ID called "Stan_Kyle_Eric_and_Kenny," which is a reference to the characters on the TV show South Park. The password was "southpark," and the password was posted on the site. That way, anyone could log in with the same ID, and request information, with less fears of creating a visible chain of messages for random snoopers. (See "Transition Defense" or "TD"). At some point, someone changed the password from "southpark," and no one knew how to reset it. So, a new anonymous ID was created: Stan_Kyle_Eric_and_Kenny2. This, however, proved too long for the GAs to type, and the ID SKEK2 (the first initial of each name) was born to save wear and tear on GAs keyboards. Over time, however, the group ID was abused. People would log in as SKEK, and post juvenile, repetitive messages, interrupting the flow of discussion on the board. The founder of the board never deleted the messages or exerted any type of control over the club. Shortly thereafter, several people who had populated the club set sail for greener pastures, and created a new club called, RealGAs.

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  6. Q: What is a "Flounder"?

    A: In the old Yahoo! clubs, people who either created a club or were granted those editorial powers were known as club "founders." RealGAs had 11 founders. After demonstrating why the gang of 11 made better lawyers than cyber-moguls, Litingrate (one of the gang of 11) coined the term "flounders" to describe the less-than-perfect abilities of the RealGAs founders.

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  7. Q: What is the RealGAs club about?

    A: As noted above (see What is a SKEK?), people tired of the juvenile activities that went on in the original Greedy Associates club. Eventually, 11 of the more-or-less regulars founded another Yahoo board called RealGAs (shorthand for Real Greedy Associates), which had basically two rules: no anonymous logins and no posting serial senseless messages on the board or the posts as well as the ID would be deleted. There were 11 founders (later known as "flounders,") so that there were enough people to form a reasonably broad consensus on what and who got deleted and to keep tabs on the board before things got out of hand and drove away people actually wanting information/company/whatever they got out of the site that was obstructed by people posting "bababouey" 15 times in a row.

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  8. Q: How did the RealGAs club end up being hosted by Findlaw's infirmation.com?

    A: You've heard the old expression, "You get what you pay for." Well, the GAs found the truth in that old adage during their time at Yahoo! The RealGAs and various regional GA boards were often times unavailable for viewing, or would fail to display certain messages, or were just painfully slow in general. FindLaw's Infirmation.com approached the GAs, and asked them if they would be willing to change hosts. The GAs explained that if FindLaw's Infirmation.com would build a site that had better specs, a better "look and feel," and more reliability than did the original Yahoo! clubs, then they would be willing to move the boards over to their site. FindLaw's Infirmation.com came through, offering spell check, search features, and far better reliability than the GAs had experienced in the last few months with Yahoo!, and the GAs relocated to FindLaw's Infirmation.com's greener pastures.

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  9. Q: What is the "IB" aka "Idiot Board" aka "Icky Board"?

    A: After the original Greedy Associates board had been spammed and turned into a virtual wasteland, the entire cast of characters that had originally populated it left for the greener pastures of the RealGAs board. Every so often, however, a GA would check back on the original board to see if it continued to be a moron-a-thon. DebtSlave, in lamenting the usefulness of the original Greedy Associate haven, coined the term, "Icky Board," due to the nature of the posts that were populating the board. Icky Board was later shortened to "IB," which some people interpret as "Idiot Board."

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  10. Q: Who or What is "Transition Defense"?

    A: Back on the old RealGAs board, someone using the ID Transition_Defense pieced together information about Latrell Sprewell, another club member. Some people argue that Transition_Defense tried to "out" his target; Transition_Defense maintains that he only tried to figure out if this person was telling the truth about his background. Oftentimes, when a user makes any reference to who is behind a particular ID - practice that is not allowed on FindLaw's Infirmation.com - some suggest that is "TD'ing;" that is, attempting to figure out who is behind a particular identity.

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  11. Q: What is a "Timmy"?

    A: Back on the IB, before it became the IB, there was someone who went by the ID of CommaChaser, and was well-regarded for his wit and way with a story, not to mention flame thrower. In response to a law student's question regarding the likelihood of partnership at a law firm (before starting as an associate), CommaChaser explained the student's folly by analogy to a former preschool classmate of his, named Timmy. CommaChaser explained that Timmy, his deskmate, urinated on himself when reminded to color within the lines, and CommaChaser analogized Timmy's obsessiveness with form over substance to that of this hapless student's quest for partnership before even learning how to practice law. Now, anyone who proves their need for proper form, at the expense of function, is referred to as a Timmy.

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  12. Q: What is "YSB"?

    A: As the IB got progressively less inhabitable, its fate was finally sealed by the arrival of someone who went by the ID of YouSpoiledBrats, or YSB for short. YSB claimed to be a personal injury lawyer, or some other lawyer who spent more time in court than he did in his office. He said that GAs were all spoiled brats, who were not real lawyers because they were too afraid to go into court. He also ridiculed them, claiming that they were too busy kissing the posteriors of the partners for whom they worked, and suggested that they spent their entire days writing letters, something beneath a real lawyer. YSB's signature style was typing in all caps (the equivalent of yelling in the cyber-realm), terrible spelling, and atrocious grammar.

    Some GAs made light of YSB, suggesting that GAs who wanted to identify themselves to other GAs, without saying so directly, should somehow work the following phrase into their conversation: "The YSB is in the details."

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  13. Q: Why do some people insist on using the incorrect spelling "rEdiculous"?

    A: You'll never see it now, thanks to infirmation.com's spell check function, but DebtSlave's total inability to spell was painfully obvious when she first arrived on the Greedy Associate scene. Her signature eloquent rants against the Man were made more memorable by her spelling errors. Her most famous misspelling was "rediculous," and GAs then adopted the misspelled version of some form of crazy solidarity with her.

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  14. Q: What is the Revised Model Salary Code (RMSC)?

    A: As a means of ensuring that member firms (i.e., BIGLAW) discharge their associate-pay obligations, the Committee on Associate Issues has undertaken a study of industry best practices. The Committee finds that many firms have been pondering tiered bonus structures. The Committee feels that this can be a positive development but cautions firms against using such a structure as a means of lowering overall payments. To assist member firms, the Revised Model Salary Code (RMSC) will now be published in dual format. Firms may adopt either salary structure, but must do so by February 15, 2000.

    Guaranteed RMSC:

    1999 $145,000
    1998 $160,000
    1997 $180,000
    1996 $195,000
    1995 $215,000
    1994 $230,000
    1993 $245,000
    1992 $260,000

    Tiered RMSC:

    Year; Base; Discretionary; 2100 hours; 2250 hours; 2400 hours
    1999 $125,000; $10,000; $10,000; $10,000; $10,000
    1998 $135,000; $15,000; $10,000; $10,000; $10,000
    1997 $150,000; $15,000; $15,000; $10,000; $10,000
    1996 $165,000; $15,000; $15,000; $15,000; $10,000
    1995 $185,000; $15,000; $15,000; $15,000; $15,000
    1994 $195,000; $20,000; $20,000; $15,000; $15,000
    1993 $205,000; $20,000; $20,000; $20,000; $20,000
    1992 $215,000; $20,000; $20,000; $20,000; $20,000*

    Note 1: The RMSC numbers for firms adopting the guaranteed structure include both the base and bonus. As a general guideline, member firms may defer up to 13% of the total compensation and still be deemed to be in compliance with the RMSC.

    Note 2: Despite the use of the term "guaranteed", the Committee does not feel that it would be inconsistent to limit the bonus to associates who submit 1800 or more aggregated billable or pro bono hours.

    Note 3: Otherwise, the term guaranteed means guaranteed.

    Note 4: While the RMSC is applicable to all member firms and is not limited to NY and California firms, fly-over firms with profits per partner of less than $400,000 may request an exemption. Exemptions will be conditional on approval of the proposed salary, which must bear close resemblance to the RMSC. Firms operating pursuant to special exemption must be quality of life firms and will not be permitted to adopt the tiered system.

    Note 5: For New York firms only, the Revised Model Salary Code does not abolish the revised model bonus code (i.e., the model code governing the law of the boom year bonus). The boom year bonus is designed to offset the NY cost of living. As all U.S. branches of member firms will be subject to these same salary obligations, the New York boom year bonus obligation will remain unmolested.

    *Plus a dedicated paralegal.

    The original RMSC post can be found here.

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  15. Q: What is the Revised Model Bonus Code (RMBC)?

    A: RMBC stands for the Revised Model Bonus Code. The original RMBC was drafted before the salary raises of 2000, and had been based upon percentages of associate salaries. The RMBC will be revised and reissued to take account for the current rates of pay and bonus structures incorporated in those rates of pay.

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  16. Q: Who was Sheila E?

    A: Back on the IB, there was someone who went by the ID of Sheila_E. Sheila_E bragged of her pulchritude, signed her posts with Xs and Os, talked of wearing thongs and going to Life and Spy in NY. Some male GA's drooled. Others mocked. Arnie_Becker claimed to have slept with her. Eventually, a consensus was reached that Sheila was really a fat guy at Willkie Farr. Hence, the poster known as Fat_Guy_at_Willkie was born.

    Sheila_E's posts portended the beginning of the end of the IB and the problem with anonymous logins. Sheila_E used the anonymous login nycassoc, as did many others, signing off with "Sheila_E" at the bottom of her posts. Of course, someone soon started pretending to be Sheila_E and when she went to sign up for the name, someone had taken it. Sheila_E had been warned that this might happen, but she was a bimbo at heart and thought that posting as an anonymous log-in hid her identity more than as a unique moniker. Humbled, she came back for a while as Sheila_XXOO before fading off to oblivion.

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  17. Q: What is "Spree disclosure"?

    A: After a spate of posts that included only a hyperlink to other sites, Latrell Sprewell made a new rule: if someone posts a hyperlink, they must disclose the subject matter of the item to which they are linking. This is to identify to unwary users what is contained behind the link. Past undisclosed links have been linked to sex sites and gore related sites (causing one GA to almost throw up in his office after viewing the aftermath of someone having jumped off of a tall building). A link must disclose the subject matter of the page, or else it will be deleted.

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  18. Q: Where can I find the Greedy Associates in the news?

    A: For an earlier compilation of the Greedy Associates in the news, click here.

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  19. Q: What is an "SP" aka "sock puppet"?

    A: An "SP" is a sock puppet i.e., another character/moniker/persona that someone uses on the board. If you've ever seen a hand puppet that's made from a sock, with buttons sewn onto it, you'll get the idea. Imagine Lambchop the sock puppet (used by Shari Lewis for children's television), or the former Pets.com sock puppet, and you'll see what we mean.

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  20. Q: Who is Plated?

    A: Goldencuffs explained the answer to this question:

    Back on the IB, someone began using the ID ih8jfkjr. Someone suggested that his ID was akin to a vanity license plate, and ih8jfkjr quickly became known as Plate. When JFK Jr. died in the summer of 1999, Plate became Plated when ih8jfkjr changed his ID to ih8edjfkjr.

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  21. Q: What is a Radio Shack firm?

    A: "Radio Shack" firms are those firms that are not in compliance with either the RMBC or RMSC. AKA: cheap-ass firms, K-Mart firms, 3rd [or lower] tier firms, etc.

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  22. Q: What are "cookies," and why does FindLaw's infirmation.com use them?

    A: Cookies are a small file that a web browser deposits in its memory cache so that a web site will ensure that the correct user is logging in as a certain ID.

    Here's why FindLaw's Infirmation.com uses cookies: Cookies help us determine whether you are logged in and as whom you are logged-in. If you delete the cookie on your hard drive, the site will no longer think you are a logged in user. Conversely, if you choose to log-in, we have to set a cookie in your browser with your log-in email, encrypted password (so no hackers can figure out what your password is), and time of log-in.

    You may ask whether there is a risk that private information is being tracked and shared with outsiders, or whether there is a security risk with cookies. The answers to these questions are relative -- of course there are some risks but that's true with anything. If you wanted to avoid all risks, you'd never leave your home. Then again, you might get radon poisoning or have a heart attack because you never exercised. Everything is relative. What is probably a more useful question is what would happen if FindLaw's Infirmation.com didn't use cookies? Would there be less risk? The answer here is: probably not. FindLaw's Infirmation.com uses cookies to identify you as a logged-in user (which must do so that you can post messages), as opposed to other methods of identifying you as a logged-in user because: (i) other methods won't let FindLaw's Infirmation.com automatically log you in at your next session; and (ii) and/or other methods won't work for users sitting behind a firewall (which is usually the case for employees at companies with security concerns). In fact, other methods may run the risk of confusing users behind a firewall e.g., when user #2 visits the site, user #2 is mistakenly logged-in as user #1. That would be much worse than cookies in terms of security.

    What about security on the browser's end? If there are cookies in the browser, can't anyone in the office sit at the computer and find those cookies? The answer is "yes". Anyone with access to your computer can find your FindLaw's Infirmation.com cookie if they were to sit at your computer and make an effort to look for it. If FindLaw's Infirmation.com didn't use cookies, people could still view your history of what sites you've visited, unless you clear your browser's history. Just as you can clear your browser's history, you clear the cookies as well. The only "security risk" with the cookie is that someone with access to your computer can actually read the contents of the cookie and determine your log-in email address, assuming, of course, that you did not clear the history and contents before the person accessed your computer. In any case, if you are worried about the cookie containing your log-in email, then get an anonymous email address at Yahoo! mail, Hotmail, or anywhere that offers free, web-based e-mail. Interestingly enough, you will find that those sites, as do most of the sites on the web, use cookies to identify you as a logged in user, in the same manner as does FindLaw's Infirmation.com.

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  23. Q: Who is the Fat Guy at Willkie?

    A: Back on the IB, there was someone who went by the ID of Sheila_E. Sheila_E bragged of her pulchritude, signed her posts with Xs and Os, talked of wearing thongs and going to Life and Spy in NY. Some male GA's drooled. Others mocked. Arnie_Becker claimed to have slept with her. Eventually, a consensus was reached that Sheila was really a fat guy at Willkie Farr. Hence, the poster known as Fat_Guy_at_Willkie was born.

    Sheila_E's posts portended the beginning of the end of the IB and the problem with anonymous logins. Sheila_E used the anonymous login nycassoc, as did many others, signing off with "Sheila_E" at the bottom of her posts. Of course, someone soon started pretending to be Sheila_E and when she went to sign up for the name, someone had taken it. Sheila_E had been warned that this might happen, but she was a bimbo at heart and thought that posting as an anonymous log-in hid her identity more than as a unique moniker. Humbled, she came back for a while as Sheila_XXOO before fading off to oblivion.

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  24. Q: What is the Patch?

    A: "Patch" is short for "pumpkin patch" or "cotton patch." Generally, the term "patch" refers to 'non-tiered' cities---i.e., those other than major legal markets such as New York City, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, or Boston. Also known as "fly-over land"...to those who don't live there.

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  25. Q: What is "NTTAWWT"?

    A: "NTTAWWT" stands for "not that there's anything wrong with that." It comes from a Seinfeld episode, in which Jerry and George are mistaken for homosexuals by a reporter. After vehemently denying the mistaken homosexual status, both Jerry and George added quickly, "Not that there's anything wrong with that."

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  26. Q: How do I type my post in html format?

    A: There is a great html tutorial posted by buffalawbabe on the Fashion Tips Board. You can check it out by clicking here.

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  27. Q: What is an "em"?

    A: Some posters on our site will use "em" to refer to third persons, in an effort to hide whether the they're talking about a male or female. As an example, "Em gave me an assignment on Friday at 5:00. I can't stand it when em does that." Substitute in "he" or "she" for "em," and you can see how it works.

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  28. Q: What is "we Todd did"?

    A: Say it out loud and quickly. You'll see what it means. Click here for the original post.

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  29. Q: Why didn't my URL show up as a link?

    A: Either you forgot to put "http://" at the beginning of it, or you posted in HTML instead of Plain Text. If you want a automatic link to your URL, you need to post in Plain Text. When you post in HTML, the processor assumes that you are going to put in any HTML tags, including link tags, that you want, and doesn't add any for you; this is necessary to keep it from adding a link on top of any linked URLs you've put in. Note: replace all of the following "[" with "<" and "]" with ">". To add a link manually, type: [a href="http://URL.goes.here"]http://URL.goes.here[/a]. "Link text goes here" will then appear as clickable text, with a link to "http://URL.goes.here". Alternatively, if you want the hyperlink to pop up inside your text (e.g., "Link"), type: [a href = "http://URL.goes.here"]Link[/a].

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  30. Q: How do I change my user name and profile?

    A: Go to FindLaw's Infirmation.com homepage, by going to http://www.infirmation.com. Make sure that you are logged-in to the site, under the name that you would like to have changed. Scroll down to the bottom of the page, and you will see: Basic Information (update). Click on the button for "update," and you should be able to change your basic registration information.

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  31. Q: What is "TMI"?

    A: Too Much Information.

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  32. Q: What is "IMHO"?

    A: In My Humble Opinion

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  33. Q: Can you translate this British slang?

    A: BritAssoc posted a couple of helpful messages about translating between American and British slang. Check out these two messages:

    Message 1

    Message 2

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  34. Q: How do I delete "cookies" from my computer?

    A: Clare Quilty, Esq. explained how to clear cookies from your computer, in Fashion Tips Board Message 21134:

    It's easy to clear the cookies on your computer. Very difficult to clear the cookie log on your firm's server, though (unless you have the admin. password).

    On your PC (assuming you use IE) Go to Tools>Internet Options. Click on the "Security" tab, scroll down and disable all cookies. Then go back to the "General" tab, click the "Delete Files" button, and click "Clear Cache." If you're really concerned, go to Windows Explorer, select the "Windows" folder, then the "Cookies" folder, and delete all of the files therein. If you're convinced you'll be sued if they go back and check your internet usage, follow Know Won's (I think it was KW) advice, and format your hard drive. Beware, even the data on a reformatted disk is still recoverable, in part. The only way to make it completely unrecoverable is to set it on fire.

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  35. Q: When is it appropriate to use the "Post as Anonymous" button?

    A: Here are the rules for the anon button:

    1) It shall be used only for posting personal stories that would out you. Good examples are what you are wearing that day, personal background, and what someone at your firm said/did/wore recently. Bad examples are what you find annoying, what you like, or anything else that would not out you in under 5 minutes to other people who know you personally or could otherwise discover through Martindale;

    2) Board administrators can see your screen name, but the rest of the community without administrative privileges cannot;

    3) It absolutely shall not be used for flames, off-color jokes, comments or propositions;

    4) You acknowledge that any board administrator (and/or someone who works for Infirmation/FindLaw) has the right to delete immediately any post made anonymously, without warning, and you promise not to whine about it. Infirmation/FindLaw already allows that right, but notice the "no whining" rule; and

    5) You acknowledge that if you abuse the "post as anonymous" button (that is, by posting off-color jokes, flames, misleading information, or otherwise non-outable information), you run the risk of a board administrator (and/or someone who works for Infirmation/FindLaw) marking your post as non-anonymous, thereby exposing your screen name as the person who posted the message.

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  36. Q: What is a "K race"?

    A: A K race is when people on the message boards try to post a message that will end in the numbers "000." In other words, a message that is a multiple of 1,000. "Stealing a K race," as the sore losers usually put it, is the terminology used for someone who manages to post a message with the number ending in -000 while no one else is around to challenge (such as the middle of the night).

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  37. Q: What is "LOL"?

    A: "LOL" stands for "laughing out loud."

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  38. Q: What is "TCB"?

    A: TCB stands for taking care of business. It's usually done alone, though some prefer the company of battery-powered items.

    Pepper first used the term in message 7410 on the Fashion Tips board. And then L2M explained that TCB stands for "taking care of business."

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  39. Q: What is "MOT"?

    A: MOT stands for Members of Tribe, slang for people who are Jewish.

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  40. Q: What is a wingnut?

    A: Devils Advocate defined the term in a Fashion Board post, explaining:

    Wingnut -- A mildly derisive FB term describing anyone with more than a certain threshold level of religious knowledge and/or belief.

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  41. Q: What happens when I post as anonymous?

    A: When you select the option to post as anonymous, a feature available on select message boards, none of the community will see the screen name that posted the message. Please be aware, however, that your screen name is visible to the administrators of that particular message board.

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  42. Q: Why do people refer to toasters?

    A: To paraphrase Displaced Texan on the issue:

    Referring to toasters in the context of homosexual relationships comes from the "Ellen" episode where Ellen comes out of the closet. Basically, she accuses a character (who is a lesbian) played by Larua Dern character of trying to "recruit" her. The Dern character sarcastically replies that one more recruit and she'd get a toaster oven. At the end of the episode, Melissa Etheridge hands Dern a toaster oven and congratulates her for bringing another lesbian into the fold. Ever since then, toasters and toaster ovens have sorta kinda been associated with gayness in general, and recruitment to gayness (or helping someone come out) in particular.

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  43. Q: Why do people refer to a siren in their posts?

    A: Know Won explained in post #28770 on the Fashion Tips Board that the "sarcasm siren" is a way of warning readers that the author is being sarcastic.

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  44. Q: How do I insert a picture into my post?

    A: Check out DebtSlave's tutorial for how to make an image show up in your post.

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